DATE: June 15, 2011
TIME: 8:00 pm
LENGTH: 2 hours
INTERVAL: yes
AGE SUITABILITY: 8+
LOCATION: Lyth Arts Centre
Christopher Guild plays works by Beethoven, Liszt and James MacMillan June 15, 2011

Christopher GuildClassical Piano Recital – Christopher Guild plays works by Beethoven, Liszt and James MacMillan

Wednesday, 15th June, 8pm, two hours including interval, age 8+

We are pleased to welcome back Christopher Guild who has just completed
six years at the Royal College of Music in London where he gained an MMus with
Distinction in November. He was born in Speyside and started to win prizes aged
15 while still a student at St. Mary's Music School, Edinburgh.

Since then his progress through the RCM, studying under Andrew Ball, has
been punctuated by regular prizes. As well as giving solo recitals in Steinway
Hall and the Royal Academy of Arts, as a chamber musician he has performed at
the Cadogan Hall and St. John's, Smith Square, as an orchestral keyboard-player
with the London Philharmonic Orchestra and the City of London Sinfonia and as a
soloist with the Isle of Wight Symphony Orchestra and St Paul's Sinfonia.

At
Lyth Christopher will perform music by Beethoven, Liszt, Britten and
Macmillan.

www.christopherguild.com

5 Responses to Christopher Guild plays works by Beethoven, Liszt and James MacMillan

  1. Leslie Myatt says:

    It is four years since Christopher Guild, a young music student at the time, gave a piano recital at Lyth Arts Centre. Last week he was invited to perform again to a near capacity audience. In his introduction he explained that he liked to perform works which were not generally well known but which were nevertheless very good music.

    The programme opened with

  2. Mike Lunan says:

    I attended the recital by Christopher Guild on 15 June. Quite simply – it was one of the best musical experiences of the last few years. I’m not normally drawn to piano recitals, but I wanted to hear the MacMillan piece (which luckly survived the programme change). The Britten was an added bonus when I saw the programme. I wasn’t expecting to get much joy from the CPE Bach, but how wrong I was! A quite stunning performance of a quite stunning piece. Christopher emphasized how much he was into playing neglected pieces rather than war-horses (not his word), and I for one was grateful. The Bach and the Reubke were both new to me – the delight of discovering such treasures is very great. Thank you, William, and thank you, Christopher. An unforgettable evening.

  3. Leslie Myatt says:

    The following Review appeared in the Caithness Courier, 22/6/11

    It is four years since Christopher Guild, a young music student at the time, gave a piano recital at Lyth Arts Centre. Last week he was invited to perform again to a near capacity audience. In his introduction he explained that he liked to perform works which were not generally well known but which were nevertheless very good music.

    The programme opened with

  4. Leslie Myatt says:

    Lyth Review
    It is four years since Christopher Guild, a young music student at the time, gave a piano recital at Lyth Arts Centre. Last week he was invited to perform again to a capacity audience. In his introduction he explained that he liked to perform works which were not generally well known but which were nevertheless very good music.
    The programme opened with Twelve Variations by CPE Bach on the baroque dance tune La Folia, a melody which has been used as a basis for variations by many composers from the seventeenth to the twentieth century.
    This was followed by Tre Preludi sopra melodie gregoriane by Respighi. The three preludes are based upon Gregorian Chant and unlike the works one usually associates with Respighi when thinking of works like The Fountains of Rome.
    An early work by the Scottish composer James Macmillan was then performed. Probably written at the time when he was influenced by the music of Stravinsky, it depicts an Ayrshire winter and has much of the violence as might be experienced in the wild weather.
    Finally before the interval an early piece, Twelve Variations, by Benjamin Britten was performed. Written at the age of 18 it has little of his later style in it; however an exacting work to perform.
    After the interval the Piano Sonata in B flat minor by Reubke a little-known German composer was performed and who died at an early age. He was a pupil of Liszt and the work, whilst showing the influence of his teacher, was extremely difficult to perform giving the audience a pyrotechnical and gymnastic musical experience.
    As an encore the soloist reverted back to the days when he used to play at the Savoy and in contrast to the main recital performed a short improvised piece which included a few popular light melodies.
    This was a concert of generally percussive music requiring great digital dexterity which was handled well by the soloist.
    Leslie Myatt

  5. Leslie Rowe says:

    The trouble is he didn’t. I persuaded an elderly relative to attend on the promise of works by the first two – and of course he was disappointed. Me too for that matter. Very good pianist but I thought a bit too clever by half to change the programme so markedly to show off his virtuosity.

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